Making Maple Syrup: A Play

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bbbbbbbbbbbbbbb bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb Making Maple Syrup: A Play Lucy and Matt are visiting their aunt in Vermont during “sugaring season.” Here, in the sugaring barn, they help prepare the season’s first batch of syrup. Aunt May: Okay, Lucy, pour some sap into the evaporation pan, and Matt, grab a skimmer. You’ll have to start skimming once it boils. Lucy: (pouring from a bucket into the pan, she pauses) Is that full enough? Aunt May: Sure. We’re going to keep on filling it up as it evaporates. Matt: What do you mean? We’ll add more sap to the batch in this pan? Aunt May: Yes. We’re going to boil most of this away. The uncooked sap is around two percent sugar. We need about 43 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup! Matt: Wow! How many gallons of sap do we have ready to boil today? bbbbbbbbbbbbbbb © Advanced Assessment Systems/LinkIt!™ Passage provided under license from PassageBank.com. Use and duplication is restricted to licensees only. bbbbbbbbbbbbbbb bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb Aunt May: We got about 130 gallons this morning from the buckets on the trees. Lucy: (calculating) So, ummm, we can make about three gallons of syrup today? Aunt May: Yes, unless you want to go back to the woods and empty more buckets. Lucy: Three gallons sounds like plenty to me! How much of this sap do I pour in? Aunt May: Every time the pan looks half empty, fill it up. We boil the sap slowly so it doesn’t scorch or burn. When we’ve boiled it all down, we heat the syrup to about 219°F. Then it’s ready to filter, and you two can start tasting it. Matt: I think I should do that. It’s too dangerous for my sister, right, Lucy? bbbbbbbbbbbbbbb © Advanced Assessment Systems/LinkIt!™ Passage provided under license from PassageBank.com. Use and duplication is restricted to licensees only.

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